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Saturday, 21 September 2019 00:00

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Monday, 16 September 2019 00:00

Patients who have discomfort between the third and fourth toes may be experiencing a condition that is referred to as Morton’s neuroma. It occurs as a result of swollen nerve tissue that grows in this area, and is known to be non-cancerous and painful. Additionally, pain may be felt on the ball of the foot. Research has indicated that patients who frequently wear high heels and participate in sporting activities may be prone to developing this condition. Effective treatment may consist of wearing different shoes, using painkillers, and some patients may benefit from taking steroid injections. There are gentle stretches that can be performed which may provide mild relief. If you are afflicted with Morton’s neuroma, it is advised that you consult with a podiatrist who can offer proper treatment options which may include surgery.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Anna Petrov of Family Foot & Ankle Care. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Wheeling and Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What is Morton's Neuroma?
Monday, 09 September 2019 00:00

A hammertoe is considered to be a deformity of the foot. It is also referred to as a “contracted toe” and is most likely noticed on the second and third toes. In severe cases, it can resemble a hammer, because the middle joint in the second toe bends in a downward direction. This deformity can happen for a variety of reasons. These can include having high arches, wearing shoes that do not have adequate room for the toes to move freely in, and prior toe injuries. Additionally, medical conditions such as arthritis and bunions may play a significant role in developing hammertoe. Mild relief can be found when the toes are gently stretched and wiggled, and it can help to wear shoes that have ample room in the toe area. Patients with a severe case of hammertoe may choose surgery, which can permanently straighten the toe. If you are afflicted with this condition, it is advised that you seek the counsel of a podiatrist who can guide you toward proper treatment options.

Hammertoes can be a painful condition to live with. For more information, contact Dr. Anna Petrov of Family Foot & Ankle Care. Our doctor will answer any of your foot- and ankle-related questions.

Hammertoe

Hammertoe is a foot deformity that occurs due to an imbalance in the muscles, tendons, or ligaments that normally hold the toe straight. It can be caused by the type of shoes you wear, your foot structure, trauma, and certain disease processes.

Symptoms

  • Painful and/or difficult toe movement
  • Swelling
  • Joint stiffness
  • Calluses/Corns
  • Physical deformity

Risk Factors

  • Age – The risk of hammertoe increases with age
  • Sex – Women are more likely to have hammertoe compared to men
  • Toe Length – You are more likely to develop hammertoe if your second toe is longer than your big toe
  • Certain Diseases – Arthritis and diabetes may make you more likely to develop hammertoe

Treatment

If you have hammertoe, you should change into a more comfortable shoe that provides enough room for your toes. Exercises such as picking up marbles may strengthen and stretch your toe muscles. Nevertheless, it is important to seek assistance from a podiatrist in order to determine the severity of your hammertoe and see which treatment option will work best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Wheeling and Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Hammertoe
Monday, 02 September 2019 00:00

Research has indicated that individuals who are sixty-five years or older commonly fall, which can result in physical injuries. If falling has occurred, elderly people may become fearful of performing daily activities. This can lead to becoming inactive, and depression may occur. There are methods that can be implemented which may help to diminish the risk of falling. These can include having regular vision tests performed, and modifying the home environment by installing grab bars in the bathroom area. Additionally, it is beneficial to remove existing rugs that are loose, and it is helpful to have medications reviewed. If you would like additional information about how falling can affect the feet, it is suggested that you speak with a podiatrist.

Preventing falls among the elderly is very important. If you are older and have fallen or fear that you are prone to falling, consult with Dr. Anna Petrov from Family Foot & Ankle Care. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality advice and care.

Every 11 seconds, an elderly American is being treated in an emergency room for a fall related injury. Falls are the leading cause of head and hip injuries for those 65 and older. Due to decreases in strength, balance, senses, and lack of awareness, elderly persons are very susceptible to falling. Thankfully, there are a number of things older persons can do to prevent falls.

How to Prevent Falls

Some effective methods that older persons can do to prevent falls include:

  • Enrolling in strength and balance exercise program to increase balance and strength
  • Periodically having your sight and hearing checked
  • Discuss any medications you have with a doctor to see if it increases the risk of falling
  • Clearing the house of falling hazards and installing devices like grab bars and railings
  • Utilizing a walker or cane
  • Wearing shoes that provide good support and cushioning
  • Talking to family members about falling and increasing awareness

Falling can be a traumatic and embarrassing experience for elderly persons; this can make them less willing to leave the house, and less willing to talk to someone about their fears of falling. Doing such things, however, will increase the likelihood of tripping or losing one’s balance. Knowing the causes of falling and how to prevent them is the best way to mitigate the risk of serious injury.  

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Wheeling and Chicago, IL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Falls Prevention
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